Publications

Peer-reviewed papers

  1. Carter G, Wilkinson G. 2016. Common vampire bat contact calls attract past food-sharing partners. Animal Behavior. (free until June 12) 116:45-51.
  2. Wilkinson G, Carter G, Bohn K, Adams D. 2016. Non-kin cooperation in bats. Philosophical Transactions B. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2015.0095 (PDF)
  3. Carter G, Wilkinson G. 2015. Social benefits of non-kin food sharing by female vampire bats. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 282: 20152524. (PDF) (supplement)
  4. Carter G, Wilkinson G. 2015. Intranasal oxytocin increases social grooming and food sharing in the common vampire bat. Hormones and Behavior. 75: 150-153. (PDF)
  5. Carter G, Leffer L. 2015. Social grooming in bats: are vampire bats exceptional? PLOS One. (open access)
  6. Carter G, Stewart A. 2015. The floral bat lure dimethyl disulphide does not attract the palaeotropical Dawn bat. Journal of Pollination Ecology. (open access)
  7. Carter G, Schoeppler D, Manthey M, Knoernschild M, Denzinger A. 2015. Distress calls of a fast-flying aerial-hawking bat (Molossus molossus) provoke inspection flights but not cooperative mobbing. PLOS One. (open access)
  8. Carter, G. 2014. The reciprocity controversy. Animal Behavior and Cognition. 1(3), 368-386. doi:10.12966/abc.08.11.2014 (open access)
  9. Kershenbaum A, D Blumstein, M Roch, C Akcay, G Backus, M Bee, K Bohn, Y Cao, G Carter et al. (42 authors) 2014. Acoustic sequences in non-human animals: A tutorial review and prospectus. Biological Reviews. doi:10.1111/brv.12160 (PDF)
  10. Carter G, Wilkinson G. 2013. Does food sharing in vampire bats demonstrate reciprocity? Communicative & Integrative Biology. 6:e25783. (open access)
  11. Carter G, Wilkinson G. 2013. Cooperation and conflict in the social lives of bats. In: Adams, R, Pedersen, S (eds). Bat Evolution, Ecology, and Conservation. Springer Science Press. pg 225-242. (PDF) (e-book)
  12. Carter G, Wilkinson G. 2013. Food sharing in vampire bats: reciprocal help predicts donations more than relatedness or harassment. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 280: 1753. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.2573 (open access, text supplement, video supplementposter)
  13. Carter G, R Logsdon, B Arnold, A Menchaca, R Medellin. 2012. Adult vampire bats produce contact calls when isolated: acoustic variation between species, colonies, and individuals. PLOS One. 7(6): e38791. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0038791. (open access)
  14. Carter G, J Ratcliffe, and B Galef. 2010. Flower bats (Glossophaga soricina) and fruit bats (Carollia perspicillata) rely on spatial cues over shapes and scents when relocating food. PLOS One. 5(5): e10808. (open access)
  15. Carter G, B Fenton, and P Faure. 2009. White-winged vampire bats (Diaemus youngi) exchange contact calls. Canadian Journal of Zoology. 87:604-608. (PDF)
  16. Carter G, M Skowronski, P Faure, B Fenton. 2008. Antiphonal calling allows individual discrimination in white-winged vampire bats. Animal Behaviour. 76:1343-1355. (PDF) (Video supplement)
  17. Carter G, D Riskin. 2006. Mystacina tuberculata. Mammalian Species. 790:1-8. (PDF)
  18. Riskin D, S Parsons, W Schutt, G Carter, J Hermanson. 2006. Terrestrial locomotion of the New Zealand short-tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata) and the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). Journal of Experimental Biology. 209:1725-1736. (PDF)
  19. Carter G, C Coen, L Stenzler, I Lovette. 2006. Avian host DNA isolated from the feces of white-winged vampire bats (Diaemus youngi). Acta Chiropterologica. 8(1):255-259. (PDF)

Submitted manuscripts

  • Chaverri G and Carter G. Acoustic degradation of bat contact calls. Behavioral Ecology.
  • Carter G. Non-human reciprocal altruism. In Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science.
  • Carter G. Blood sharing in vampire bats. In Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science. (PDF)

Datasets

  1. Carter, G. 2015. Playback response data for “Common vampire bat contact calls attract past food-sharing partners”. Figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1613493
  2. Carter, G. 2015. Data for Social benefits of non-kin food sharing by female vampire bats. Figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1528118
  3. Carter, G. 2015. Data for Carter & Leffer. Social grooming in bats: are vampire bats exceptional? PLOS One. Figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1465034.
  4. Carter, G. 2015. Playback response data for “Distress calls of a fast-flying aerial-hawking bat (Molossus molossus) provoke inspection flights but not mobbing”. Figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1454597
  5. Carter, G. G. & Wilkinson, G. S. 2013 Data from: Food sharing in vampire bats: reciprocal help predicts donations more than relatedness or harassment. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.tg7b1

Five example posts from socialbat.org

  1. The goals of science vs scientists
  2. Can friendships reduce the burden on family?
  3. Caves and the origins of echolocation
  4. Bats and the huddler’s dilemma
  5. on reciprocal altruism

Other

  1. Carter, G. 2015. Cooperation and social bonds in common vampire bats. PhD Thesis. University of Maryland.  http://hdl.handle.net/1903/16594
  2. Carter G. 2011. The future of bat research and conservation. Sonorensis Magazine: Celebrating Bats. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. 31:1. (PDF)
  3. Carter G. 2011. Food sharing in vampire bats. Bat Conservation Journal. Organization for Bat Conservation. Fall 2011 Issue.
  4. Carter G. 2005. Bat diversity and abundance in Cusuco National Park core zone, Honduras. Internal report for Operation Wallacea, UK. (PDF)
  5. Carter G. 2004. A field key to the bats of Trinidad. Distributed to the Wildlife Section of the Forestry Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Trinidad. Updated in 2010 and 2013. (doc)